Video: What Is Paul’s Allegory of Sarah and Hagar About?

Today’s question: “Why does Paul say that Sarah and Hagar represent two covenants in Galatians 4:21-31? Where can we see this reality in the Old Testament?”

Within the video, I recommend a twopart article by James Jordan. I explore some of themes mentioned in this video further here (and speculate a little on the subject of the scapegoat motif here).

If you have any questions for me, please leave them on my Curious Cat account. If you would like to support these videos, you can do so on my Patreon account.

About Alastair Roberts

Alastair Roberts (PhD, Durham University) writes in the areas of biblical theology and ethics, but frequently trespasses beyond these bounds. He participates in the weekly Mere Fidelity podcast, blogs at Alastair’s Adversaria, and tweets at @zugzwanged.
This entry was posted in Bible, Galatians, Genesis, Hermeneutics, NT, OT, OT Theology, Podcasts, Questions and Answers, Theological, Video. Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Video: What Is Paul’s Allegory of Sarah and Hagar About?

  1. calebt45 says:

    The soundcloud link doesn’t seem to have a “download” button, whereas your two more recent uploads do. Could you kindly add it, please?

  2. Angus J says:

    I’m sorry that I don’t have time to engage with this question in detail, but I do remember a very good explanation of it by David Pawson when I listened to recordings of his series of sermons on Galatians. These sermons considerably improved my understanding of this letter, and I was very impressed with how closely Pawson’s exegesis matched what I found in Philip Graham Ryken’s commentary (P&R, 2005; Reformed Expository Commentary Series). Many of David Pawson’s recorded sermons can be found online; and the one relevant to this passage is at http://davidpawson.org/resources/resource/781
    If you’ve not come across him before, he’s well worth a listen.

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