The Reopened Wounds of Jacob

The Theopolis blog has just posted an article of mine, in which I discuss the story of David against the background of the story of Jacob, exploring how things changed following his sin with Bathsheba.

Just as the beginning of David’s life is a powerful illustration of the capacity of a blessed and righteous man to restore a people to its full health and vigour, as David epitomizes the spirit of Jacob raised to its true stature, in the latter days of David we see the sins of the house of Jacob returning to David’s bosom and the old family wounds bursting open once more. David is Jacob throughout, wrestling with both the promises and the warnings of its deep historical destiny. Will it decay as it exacerbates the sins found at its origins, or ascend into the realization of the divine purpose held out to and intimated to it from the beginning?

Much as David might have fancied that he could compartmentalize his sin in the privacy of his own life, as human beings we are not detached individuals. The poison that David introduced into his house exacted its greatest toll from his children. He lived to see in his own sons the reflection and exacerbation of his own wickedness, and in his wives, daughter, and slain sons the true cost of actions that he once lightly committed. Despite forgiveness and a measure of restoration, David was never the same man again. He remained Jacob, but experienced but the tragic shadow of an identity that was once glorious in him. Sin exacts its bitter price.

Read the whole article here.

About Alastair Roberts

Alastair Roberts (PhD, Durham University) writes in the areas of biblical theology and ethics, but frequently trespasses beyond these bounds. He participates in the weekly Mere Fidelity podcast, blogs at Alastair’s Adversaria, and tweets at @zugzwanged.
This entry was posted in 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, Bible, Christian Experience, Ethics, Guest Post, OT, OT Theology, Sex and Sexuality, Theological, Theopolis. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Reopened Wounds of Jacob

  1. Pingback: Biblical Studies Carnival (April 2019) - spoiledmilks

  2. Pingback: Biblical Studies Carnival (March 2019) - spoiledmilks

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