Podcast: Should We Hope To Die At 75?

Mere FidelityThe latest episode of Mere Fidelity has just been posted. This week Derek, Matt, and I discuss a Christian attitude towards mortality in a culture driven by the fear of death. The starting point for our discussion is Ezekiel Emanuel’s recent Atlantic article, Why I Hope To Die At 75. Emanuel writes:

[H]ere is a simple truth that many of us seem to resist: living too long is also a loss. It renders many of us, if not disabled, then faltering and declining, a state that may not be worse than death but is nonetheless deprived. It robs us of our creativity and ability to contribute to work, society, the world. It transforms how people experience us, relate to us, and, most important, remember us. We are no longer remembered as vibrant and engaged but as feeble, ineffectual, even pathetic.

By the time I reach 75, I will have lived a complete life. I will have loved and been loved. My children will be grown and in the midst of their own rich lives. I will have seen my grandchildren born and beginning their lives. I will have pursued my life’s projects and made whatever contributions, important or not, I am going to make. And hopefully, I will not have too many mental and physical limitations. Dying at 75 will not be a tragedy.

Listen to the podcast here and please share any thoughts that you might have in the comments. You can also follow the podcast on iTunes, or using this RSS feed.

About Alastair Roberts

Alastair Roberts (PhD, Durham University) writes in the areas of biblical theology and ethics, but frequently trespasses beyond these bounds. He participates in the weekly Mere Fidelity podcast, blogs at Alastair’s Adversaria, and tweets at @zugzwanged.
This entry was posted in Christian Experience, Culture, Ethics, On the web, Podcasts, Society, Theological. Bookmark the permalink.

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