Podcast: Echoes of Exodus

Mere FidelityMere Fidelity is back, with an episode about the book that Andrew and I wrote together, Echoes of Exodus: Tracing Themes of Redemption Through Scripture, which is just about to be released by Crossway (and is already available for pre-order). Within the book, Andrew and I try to demonstrate the presence of Exodus as a unifying and illuminating theme throughout the entirety of the biblical narrative, from Genesis to Revelation.

You can also follow the podcast on iTunes, or using this RSS feed. Listen to past episodes on Soundcloud and on this page on my blog.

About Alastair Roberts

Alastair Roberts (PhD, Durham University) writes in the areas of biblical theology and ethics, but frequently trespasses beyond these bounds. He participates in the weekly Mere Fidelity podcast, blogs at Alastair’s Adversaria, and tweets at @zugzwanged.
This entry was posted in Bible, Exodus, Hermeneutics, My Books, OT, Podcasts, Theological. Bookmark the permalink.

5 Responses to Podcast: Echoes of Exodus

  1. Geoff says:

    Many thanks for this. In the UK , as much as I prefer to use a local Christian Bookshop, CLC ,they don’t get Crossways books, so I’ll have to order a copy over the internet.
    The exrapolation of the gospel from Lot and the Exodus theme is uplifting, engendering awe and worship.
    As it happens, I heard a great gospel sermon a couple of weeks ago in a Reformed church based on Judges 5 and Debroah’s song , with echoes of the Exodus, in the mountain trembling, the river and Miriam’s song of deliverance, with cross references to the psalms and our songs of deliverance, in the atonement, the cross. This led to who the song was sung to, God, believers, self, those with unbelief, Kings/rulers in power and who our gospel songs are to be sung to. Everyone.

  2. Aaron Siver says:

    Hi Alastair,

    I just finished listening to the Mere Fidelity episode and enjoyed it greatly. Listening to the episode, a few comments about echoes in the Sacraments teased an issue in my mind, and I’d like to hear you run with it a bit.

    Is there an Exodus resonance in weekly corporate worship? Or should there be? Is it actually or potentially more apparent in certain forms or styles of public worship than others? My instincts say “yes” to all of those questions. How can we lean into an Exodus resonance to help structure our weekly worship to better form us for life?

    Thanks,
    Aaron

    • There are definitely various resonances. Whether it is in the Passover themes in the Supper. Or in our being called out of the Egypt of this age. Or the themes of pilgrimage through the wilderness towards the Promised Land of the new creation. Or in the recalling of God’s past Exodus-shaped deliverances. Or the covenant-renewing themes of worship as a return to the covenant mountain. Etc., etc.

  3. Geoff says:

    I’ve been able to order copy of your book from CLC, locally,(more expensive,- something to do with having to go through their supplier, not Crossways, but there you go having bought, yesterday Adrian Warnock’s Raised with Christ, on the Resurrection, a Crossways publication.
    Only just started it, but it’s not such a tome for a layman, as NT Wright’s book.
    Promise of life from Genesis 3 in the pronounced certainty of death, chimes with the theme Resurrection to life from inevitable, virtual, destruction and death,and seems like a figuaral theme interlinked, redolent with echoes of the Exodus, does it not.
    Particularly as Easter approaches, are they not two sides of the same exodus/resurrection coin? Just a thought.

  4. Pingback: Review: ‘Echoes of Exodus’ (Roberts, Wilson) – theologydelish

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